What Are The Health Benefits Of Soursop?

Soursop

Soursop is having a resurgence at the moment, especially on social media. While it’s relatively new to the western world, it has been used in herbal remedies and tinctures for centuries in South America. The fruit is being championed as a wonder ingredient for your health as it’s thought to help boost your immune system and fight off disease. But, is there any science behind these claims?

What is Soursop?

Soursop is a fruit that grows in tropical areas, including South America, the Caribbean and parts of Africa. It’s also known as graviola and custard apple. It has a green skin and looks somewhat like a spiky mango with white flesh and brown seeds inside. 

What are the health benefits of Soursop?

Since the Nineties, Soursop has been championed for its wide ranging health benefits. The leaves and root are known to boost your immune system, help soothe stomach ailments and ease hypertensionSoursop is also a powerful antioxidant and a good source of vitamin C, B1 and B2. The latter two along with magnesium help to boost your energy levels without giving you the dip that is associated with caffeine.

In recent years, two studies have also highlighted Soursop’s potential to block pain and reduce inflammation.

A quick scour of social media will bring up posts declaring soursops ability to slow or prevent cell mutation. In 1997, a study was published in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry which indicated that Soursop compounds might be effective in stopping cell mutation, but there haven’t been any clinical studies to further this line of thought.

Can you take Soursop supplements?

You can eat Soursop, but as with most things you’d need to consume a lot to attain the recommended amounts. Fortunately, there are supplements that offer concentrated doses. Graviola Fruit by Rio Amazon, £11.99, utilises all parts of the fruit and contains the antioxidant, CoQ10. The supplement also contains annonaceous acetogenins. It’s recommended that you take between three-to-six supplements a day before food.

While it’s clear that more research needs to be done around the leaves, root and pulp of Soursop, there is little doubt that this is an ingredient we`re going to see a lot more of moving forward.

This content is not intended to replace conventional medical treatment. Any suggestions made and all herbs listed are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, condition or symptom. Personal directions and use should be provided by a clinical herbalist or other qualified healthcare practitioner.

Shabir Daya | , , , , , , , , ,