How To Reboot Your Motivation And Stick To Your Goals

Goals

Last year, the social media network for athletes Strava pinpointed Friday 12th January as the day most people are likely to give up on their New Year’s resolution. Strava analysed over 31.5 million global January activities to pinpoint this specific date as ‘Quitters’ Day’. If the same can be said of this year, then we’ll all be pressing snooze and rolling over for an extra hour of sleep rather than hitting the treadmill.

But why is it so common to quit within less than two weeks? Well, it’s January and it’s likely that while you started the month with a fresh bout of positivity and determination, life’s day-to-day tasks and toils have ground you down. Here are the expert tips to reboot your motivation and willpower:

Be realistic

It can be tempting to be overly ambitious and set yourself life-changing goals. While they look good on paper, you run the risk of being part of the quitters gang on 12th January. ‘Set goals that are achievable and can be easily tracked,’ says Dr Zain Sikafi, CEO and Founder, Mynurva. ‘This will give you the satisfaction of being able to track your progress and can be a fantastic source of motivation as you monitor.’ Whether you use a fitness tracking app on your phone or write down your achievements in a daily or weekly journal, you’ll be surprised by how motivating it can be to see how much you’ve accomplished over time.

Focus on one goal at a time

While cutting out sugar and running home for work at least three times a week might seem perfectly plausible from the comfort of your sofa after a Netflix marathon, it will feel less so at 6.30pm on a Tuesday evening when it’s pitch black outside and the heavens have opened. Instead, embrace just one change. Try running home once a week or cut out your four o’clock Galaxy bar (we recommend replacing it with one teaspoon of Organic Maca Powder mixed with almond milk).

A study published in the Journal of Consumer Research found that we are more effective at focusing on one goal at a time and were less successful when we were juggling several.

Do your research

Going cold turkey on something during one of the coldest, darkest months of the year is hard, especially if it’s something you truly enjoy, such as a glass of red wine. It’s worth doing some research to see if there is anything to help ease the withdrawal. For example, if you usually go out on a Friday night, swap the pub for the cinema. If you’ve decided to give up sugar, stock up on Chromium Complex by Lamberts to help reduce the cravings. If you want to get fit and stick to your twice-weekly gym sessions, invest in a fitness band to monitor your improvement and to help set realistic goals. And, if your goal is to reduce your screen time for the foreseeable future, put the Screen Time app into action and shut down your social media at 9pm every night.

Enlist the help of friends

We’re less likely to give up if we’ve got the support of our friends. When it comes to fitness goals research has shown that not only are you more likely to workout, but you’ll put more effort in and exercise for longer. Scientists at the MIT Sloan School of Management went as far as to say exercise is ‘socially contagious’. If you can’t find a friend to workout with, try signing up to a class rather than hitting the gym solo.

Visualise your goal

Rhonda Byrne has made a fortune from The Secret for no reason. Visualising your goals is one of the best ways to keep you mentally motivated. When it’s losing weight giving up alcohol or finding a new job, creating a physical visualisation board of the end goal will help you achieve it.

The idea of visualising yourself in your goal was validated by psychologists at the University of Liege in Belgium. Experts found that creating ‘self-defining’ future memories really can have a positive impact on achieving your goals. So, if you take just one thing from this, make sure it’s the importance of maintaining a positive mental attitude.