Trinny & Shabir On Supplements For Every Age

trinny

Knowing what supplements to take at what age can be confusing, so Trinny and Shabir dedicated a Facebook Live to the topic. While they’ve covered the fundamental supplements you should be taking depending on your age, it’s important to note that there are some issues that can affect us throughout our lives. For example, many of us lead stressful lives regardless of our age and stress can deplete our vitamin B12 levels.

You might not need to take all of these supplements, but here is a basic template of the supplements for every age…

In your 20’s

At this age many people live a fast-paced lifestyle and often they may be not eating the correct foods or may skip a meal or are simply not eating enough of the right foods. The two key supplements are a good quality multivitamin and omega 3.

Take the multivitamin of your choice ensuring this supplies vitamin A for healthy skin and folic acid or folate, which is important for anyone planning a pregnancy.

Take an omega 3 supplement because research indicates that omega 3’s display multiple benefits by calming inflammation; are required for hormone production; help to moisturise skin but also prevent acne, spots and blemishes; for brain performance and provide a host of other benefits. Remember that these are termed essential fatty acids because they are vital for a number of processes and the body cannot manufacture them.

Research shows that we don’t tend to get enough omega 3 from our diet – some indict that we’re up to 40% deficient. A good fish oil supplement will be of benefit such as Lion Heart Omega 3 Fish Oil or Krill Oil which provides the cleanest source of omega 3’s. If you are a vegan look to Echiomega, which contains echium seed oil. Flaxseeds and hemp seeds are a good source of omega 3 for vegetarians.

In your 30’s

You might be thinking about or already have had children. It would be prudent to switch-up your multivitamin. A prenatal multivitamin, such as Wild Nutrition’s Food Grown Fertility, is ideal as it supports preconception and the very earliest stages of pregnancy.

If you do conceive we would recommend that you change over to Wild Nutrition’s Food Grown Pregnancy, which is a balanced blend of vitamins and minerals to provide you and your baby with the correct levels of vitamins and minerals.

You should still keep up with your omega 3 supplement. It might be worth incorporating a good quality probiotic at this age because your digestive system might be sluggish. A probiotic will help support your digestive system and get your gut working optimally. Mega Probiotic ND is an eight strain probiotic. Taking it on a daily basis helps support your digestion, enhance your immune system, provide energising B vitamins and detoxify the intestines.

Eating more fermented foods will help to support the bacteria in your gut, but it’s worth noting that a lot of the goodness can be destroyed by your stomach acid, so it’s still worth taking a probiotic.

In your 40’s

You should continue with your omega 3, probiotic and multivitamin supplements. Unless you are trying to conceive, you can revert back to the multivitamin you took in your 20’s.

Generally speaking, most women enter the perimenopause stage in their 40’s. You don’t necessarily have hot flushes, but you may notice subtle changes such as lower energy levels or a loss of concentration. Phytoestrogens, such as clover and sage, have hormone mimicking powers that can help balance out the declining oestrogen levels. We tend to recommend Sage Complex to balance your hormones.

Neuro-Mag is another supplement that we would recommend people start taking in their 40’s. As you go through your 40’s you might experience changes in your sleep patterns and feel more anxious. Magnesium is required in over 300 chemical reactions in your body. Magnesium citrate is magnesium in a citrus form and has a cleansing effect on your body and helps to detox. Neuro-Mag is a different type and is absorbed efficiently and taken up by the nervous system, helping you to relax. It has a calming rather than drowsy effect, so it can be taken in the morning and evening.

Magnesium can be absorbed through your skin. There are oil sprays, which contain magnesium chloride that can be used locally to help ease joint pain. However, if you are looking for something to help support your nervous system, I would recommend Neuro-Mag.

In your 50’s

While you should stick with your multivitamin, omega 3, probiotic and Neuro-Mag, you may decide to give up your Sage Complex, if you have gone through the menopause (the average age is 51 years). You should consider introducing digestive enzymes into your routine.

During these years, your digestive enzyme production is roughly a third of what it was in your 20’s. The decline in female hormones can result in a spike in production of cortisol (stress hormone), which encourages your levels of insulin. Digestive enzymes help to break down your food and may help reduce bloating – we recommend Super Enhanced Digestive Enzymes.

You may also want to think about taking a quality calcium supplement, especially if you have a history of osteoporosis in your family or have suffered with joint issues. Bone Restore with Vitamin K2 provides three highly absorbable forms of calcium, plus several nutrients which are vital to help strengthen the joints and bone structures including vitamin D3 and vitamin K2.

We also recommend people in their 50’s have their vitamin B12 levels tested. Many of us do not have sufficient amounts of a specific protein (Intrinsic Factor) that carries vitamin B12 from the gut into the bloodstream. Signs of vitamin B12 deficiency: weakness, fatigue, short of breath, pale of jaundiced looking skin and sensations of pins and needles.

In your 60’s

You may wish to stop taking Bone Restore or your calcium supplement if osteopenia or osteoporosis are no longer a concern. Continue with your multivitamin, omega 3, probiotics and digestive enzyme. As well as vitamin B12, you should go and have your vitamin D levels checked because your body’s ability to manufacture D3 declines past 60’s even when skin is exposed to sunlight.

If you do need B12, then use B12 Boost oral spray. For Vitamin D3, I would consider the newer nutraceutical forms such as Micro-Liposomal Vitamin D3 for their ability to deliver this vitamin into each and every cell.

For more from Trinny, check out her YouTube channel, here.

Shabir And Trinny On The Best Supplements

Trinny and Shabir

If you find the world of supplements overwhelming then watching this 20 minute video will help. Shabir and Trinny explore the best supplements and explain what they’re good for and why you might benefit from taking them…

Read More…

Total Wellbeing: The Term You’ll Be Hearing About A Lot In 2019

total wellbeing

There were whisperings of self-care throughout 2017, but it wasn’t until this year that the term really came into its own. Over the past few months brands, magazines and influencers have all tapped into the theme. It has its own dedicated week in November and a quick scroll of Instagram on a Sunday reveals that it even has its own hashtag, #sundayselfcare.  

But, what does self-care actually mean? Well, essentially it’s anything that encourages you to spend some quality time with yourself and leaves you feeling good, including taking a bath, putting on a face mask or reading your book, you name it. The NHS defines it clearly as ‘keeping fit and healthy, understanding when you can look after yourself, when a pharmacist can help, and when to get advice from your GP or another health professional.’

According to Mintel’s latest report, as we progress into next year self-care will evolve into ‘total wellbeing’. The report states, ‘Consumers are treating their bodies like an ecosystem and seeking solutions that complement their personal health and evolving needs.’ From the moisturisers we slather on to the sprays we use to clean our houses and the cars we choose to drive, total wellbeing spans across all aspects of our life.

“Consumers are looking externally to their surroundings and internally towards their physical and mental wellbeing, expecting holistic approaches to wellness,” says Gabrielle Lieberman, Director of Trends & Social Media Research Americas. “Developments in health monitoring, such as skin sensors or ingestible capsules, will satisfy consumers’ demand for this personalised approach, while also building on scientific research in these emerging fields.”

In terms of skincare it’s likely that you’ll be hearing a lot more about probiotics and the many benefits good bacteria can have on our complexions. Of course, pre- and probiotic skincare isn’t new. In fact, good bacteria has been used in formulations for a while, but up until now it hasn’t been highlighted. Brands such as Aurelia Probiotic Skincare have been championing ‘biotic’ ingredients and the bestselling Botanical Cream Deodorant is testimony to its efficacy.

When it comes to supplements, it’s likely that future formulations will be developed in spray form as this is the best way for the body to absorb most nutrients. And, it’s likely that our supplements will be tailored to our specific needs. Although, this won’t necessarily happen next year, you can expect to read a lot more about the importance of monitoring your vitamin and mineral levels as part of the total wellbeing approach. If you’re baffled by which supplements you should be taking, it is worth reading Shabir’s Essential 6 For Optimal Health.

On The Soapbox – Supplements

Which Vitamins and supplements should we take and which can we leave? Shabir Daya, pharmacist and co-founder of victoriahealth.com, explains how to supplement well

 

  • I believe that a multivitamin is the first point of call and I would consider it as bridging the gap between food and a possible deficiency within the body. Think of it as an insurance policy in case a deficiency exists. Seek out one that closely resembles where vitamins come from – that’s to say, food. Synthetically produced vitamins aren’t as beneficial to the body as those from wholefood sources. I recommend Nature’s Way Alive! Daily Multivitamin Ultra Potency.

    After taking a multi-vitamin for a few weeks, gradually introduce probiotics such as Food Science Of Vermont Mega Probiotic ND and/or other supplements (perhaps turmeric, to fight cell mutation, and vitamin D3 – every gland in the body has a Vitamin D receptor). By following this slow regimen, it allows you to gauge if and which of the supplements have made a difference to you.

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Seven Easy Additions To Your Morning Routine For Glowing Skin

francis-philips

As a Nutritional Therapist, I like to focus on giving advice to my clients that can be incorporated into everyday life. I’m not a fan of diets or fads and I’m aware that unless the advice is do-able, it’s just not going to be adhered to. That’s why I often suggest ‘adding-in’ helpful practices. Here are some of my favourite small additions that could give you glowing skin if implemented regularly…

Drink a large glass of water upon waking

This is one of the nutrition basics but it’s one that can be so easily overlooked. Dehydration really shows on the skin as your body prioritises the more ‘vital’ organs. Some people love getting up and drinking hot water with lemon and that’s wonderful if you have the time. But, if you don’t then a large glass of water is just as hydrating. I also find it’s a much easier way of encouraging compliance.

Dry body brushing

This is great for lymphatic stimulation, as well as exfoliating the skin. Your lymph can only be moved manually as it doesn’t get ‘pumped’ in the same way your blood does. Practicing dry body brushing has been said to reduce cellulite and improve skin tone. Start at your feet and brush upwards in small circular motions towards your heart. For arms, begin at the hands and work upward. For the stomach, work in a counter-clockwise pattern. I prefer to do this in the morning rather than the evening as it can be quite energising. A couple of minutes before showering is ideal.

Alternating hot/cold shower

Again, this is great for your lymphatic system. It also helps to improve blood circulation. Blood flow to the surface is what carries the nutrients from your diet to the skin. I suggest alternating between hot and cold right at the end of showering, sticking to each temperature for about 20-30 seconds before switching (it’s meant to feel a little bracing but there’s no need to push it to where you feel uncomfortable). Then repeat this in total about three times.

Have an antioxidant-rich breakfast

Antioxidants are an essential part of the diet for healthy skin. They help protect against damaging ‘free radicals’ (the unstable chemicals in our environment that can cause premature ageing). They protect our collagen and elastin, vital proteins that maintain elasticity as well as increasing blood flow to the surface of our skin to help achieve that glow! They can be found in fruit and vegetables so it’s important to eat a wide variety (especially focus on ‘eating a rainbow’). Foods that are particularly high in antioxidants include blueberries, cherries and strawberries (or any seasonal berry in fact). That’s why I advocate including them in your breakfast in some way – either in a smoothie or as a topping for porridge or granola. My all-time favourite antioxidant-rich breakfast is an Açaí bowl.

Don’t forget about including ‘good’ fats

I think people are less scared nowadays about including fats in their diets (the bottom line: ‘good’ fat doesn’t make you fat). I encourage my clients to incorporate either avocados, nuts, seeds, nut butters, chia seeds, hemp seeds or flaxseeds into their breakfasts. The omega-3 fats found in these foods help keep skin plump as well as keeping you satiated for longer so less likely to eat sugary snacks. Omega-3 is also a great anti-inflammatory.

Vitamin C

Topical vitamin C is big news these days. As well as being an antioxidant, it also plays a key role in collagen formation and synthesis (that’s the protein that keeps skin looking bouncy and youthful). I recommend both topical and dietary sources for maximum effect. Our bodies can’t store vitamin C so it’s important to regularly include sources of it in our diet. Foods rich in vitamin C include citrus fruits and berries.

Take your supplements with breakfast (and save the coffee for mid-morning)

You’re much more likely to remember to take supplements if you take them at the same time every day. Most supplements can be taken alongside your breakfast so it’s easier to remember. Try to avoid drinking coffee at the same time, however, as caffeine can inhibit nutrient absorption. It’s best to save coffee until mid-morning if possible.

Frances Phillips is a Nutritional Therapist and Health & Beauty Writer, www.thenaturaledit.com.