Is It Worth Investing In Anti-Pollution Skincare?

chimeny-pollution

Pollution levels have been hitting the headlines recently. Over the past few years, certain areas of London have usually surpassed the legal limit for gas emissions within the first couple of weeks of a new year. In 2017, the capital breached EU limits at nearly 50 sites with Brixton Road in Lambeth reaching 94 micrograms of nitrogen dioxide per cubic metre of air (the maximum is 40ug/m3). While most of us are aware of the harmful impact excessive pollution has on our health, especially our lungs, experts are still exploring the ways it impacts our skin.

With a handful of studies highlighting that pollution can damage our skin and exacerbate the ageing process, it’s no surprise that a new genre of anti-pollution skincare has developed, and it’s proving popular. So much so, between January and June last year sales of anti-pollution products grew by 30 percent and the category was valued at £3.1 million, according to NPD.

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Preventing Prickly Heat

Preventing-Prickly-Heat

Prickly heat, also known as heat rash, is one of those skin problems that few of us give a seconds thought until we’re on holiday and the uncomfortable, itchy rash appears across our chest and arms. It’s a common issue that plenty of Brits suffer with after a long day at the beach or by the pool. With the summer holiday season just around the corner, we’ve outlined the key methods of treatment and prevention to ensure heat rash doesn’t put a dampener on your break.

What is prickly heat?

Prickly Heat, also known as miliaria or heat rash, is a skin condition that occurs in hot, humid weather conditions when small particles of sweat block the sweat glands causing a rash to appear on the body. The rash can develop anywhere on the body, but it most commonly occurs on the face, neck, back, chest and thighs. It is composed of tiny spots or bumps that are surrounded by an area of red inflamed and itchy skin. The trapped sweat causes localised irritation and the characteristic heat rash.

Whilst prickly heat can also occur during the winter months in those that sweat excessively, there is a theory that it is the exposure of the skin to the sun, that in some, causes a photochemical reaction which releases compounds that can cause excessive sweating resulting in the blockage of the sweat glands and the characteristic rash. Read More…