Is It Time We Took Skin Issues More Seriously?

skin issues

Even if you count yourself lucky and rarely have to worry red patches on your cheeks or an ever-growing sun spot above your left brow, we’ve all woken up with a corker of a blemish that captures the gaze of anyone you encounter for the next three days. Those who have waged a war against skin issues, including rosacea and acne will be only too aware of the mental impact these can have over time. 

This week, the British Skin Foundation shared a survey that revealed that nine in 10 dermatologists believe that not enough importance is placed on the psychological impact skin conditions can have on us. “This survey demonstrates that dermatologists recognise some patients experience psychological distress associated with their skin condition,” says Dr Andrew Thompson, Reader in Clinical Psychology and Practitioner Clinical Psychologist, University of Sheffield and Sheffield Health and Social Care NHS Foundation Trust.

“It also indicates that whilst dermatology is making great advances in treating the medical aspects of skin disease, perhaps not enough is being done to address the accompanying psychological effects,” says Dr Thompson. In a world where we can disguise skin concerns with make-up or add a filter to a selfie some might assume that battling with a skin concern is less of an issue than it used to be. However, in the last few months, two writers have shared their experiences with rosacea and psoriasis and how they have impacted their confidence and mental health.

While Rose Gallagher might appear to be confident on her Instagram stories, she revealed that her rosacea still affects her mental health: “It still impacts how attractive I feel in myself, especially when it flares up.” On the other hand, Sophie Cullen struggled to have her psoriasis diagnosed.

This is not uncommon as Consultant Psychologist Dr Alexandra Mizara explains, “Skin patients often experience that they are not listened to or understood by their healthcare providers. The occasions that they are listened to and understood are rare and extraordinary.”

So, how can you seek out support, or help someone you know? “If you suffer with a skin condition that has impacted adversely on your life, talk openly about it to your doctor and ask them to refer you to see a psychologist,” says Dr Mizara. If you don’t get far with this, it is also worth seeking out skin disease wellbeing services in your area or talk-based therapies to help tackle any low mood or anxiety. Dr Mizara also recommends looking up charities and support groups.

For those looking for a natural remedy to help ease their skin issues, Clear Skin Complex by Viridian contains probiotics, zinc, selenium and burdock root to help soothe a range of conditions, including acne, eczema and psoriasis. While it won’t fix these concerns overnight, it does help support your body and ease inflammatory skin conditions. Shabir has written extensively about the supplement, here.

How Does Sleep Affect Your Skin?

sleepskin

According to new research, the average Brit regularly survives on less than six hours of sleep a night. Most of us are well-versed with the implications of not getting sufficient sleep, including daytime fatigue, irritability and a shorter concentration span. Studies have also solidified the link the between a lack of sleep and weight gain. The impact on our skin is rarely talked about. Read More…

Everything You Need To Know About Pigmentation

Wheat field

At last, we’re having a summer. Getting the limbs out. Firing up the barbecue. Turning our pale faces to the sun. Only – let’s stop right there. Because while getting some sunshine on your face and chest feels just sooooooo good, there’s a heavy price to pay not too far down the line. Not in terms of wrinkles – we know all about those – but pigmentation problems.

You can call them ‘age spots’ (although they tend to turn up way ahead of cashing in your pension). Your Great Aunt Dorothea probably referred to them as ‘liver spots’. But in fact, they should better be referred to as ‘sun spots’ – because they’re a direct result of accumulated sun damage, which triggers melanin-producing cells in the skin to lose control and produce too much pigment as a defence mechanism – on the face and chest, in particular, but also the arms and backs of the hands, where they’re harder to conceal. Read More…

Using Salicylic Acid For Blackheads

Salicylic Acid

Blackheads can be difficult to get rid of and even with a good cleansing routine, these stubborn blemishes often remain. Even though they are stubborn, it is not difficult to get rid of blackheads or to reduce their occurrence. Salicylic acid is a very effective ingredient in treating oily skin prone to blackheads and open pores.

Blackheads can develop at any stage of one’s life but generally start from our teens during which time our hormones are usually out of balance. We start producing more androgens or hormones that stimulate oil production. These oils along with dead skin cells get clogged up in the pores where they get exposed to oxygen from the air which turns them black and solid. The areas affected the most appear to be the oily areas on the face, mostly the nose, chin and cheeks. Read More…

Preventing Prickly Heat

Preventing-Prickly-Heat

Prickly heat, also known as heat rash, is one of those skin problems that few of us give a seconds thought until we’re on holiday and the uncomfortable, itchy rash appears across our chest and arms. It’s a common issue that plenty of Brits suffer with after a long day at the beach or by the pool. With the summer holiday season just around the corner, we’ve outlined the key methods of treatment and prevention to ensure heat rash doesn’t put a dampener on your break.

What is prickly heat?

Prickly Heat, also known as miliaria or heat rash, is a skin condition that occurs in hot, humid weather conditions when small particles of sweat block the sweat glands causing a rash to appear on the body. The rash can develop anywhere on the body, but it most commonly occurs on the face, neck, back, chest and thighs. It is composed of tiny spots or bumps that are surrounded by an area of red inflamed and itchy skin. The trapped sweat causes localised irritation and the characteristic heat rash.

Whilst prickly heat can also occur during the winter months in those that sweat excessively, there is a theory that it is the exposure of the skin to the sun, that in some, causes a photochemical reaction which releases compounds that can cause excessive sweating resulting in the blockage of the sweat glands and the characteristic rash. Read More…

Herb-y Skin Solvers

apple_juice

Having once been on a Beauty Bible roadshow with my co-author Sarah Stacey – one of those so-glamorous ‘If-it’s-Tuesday-it-must-be-Crawley’ whistle-stop tours around the high street chemists of Britain – I’ve acquired some real insights into problem skins, and how much they trouble teenagers, in particular.

Trouble is, many of the products targeted at spots, acne and oiliness are the exact opposite of what’s needed. At times, I found myself standing sentinel over the shelves selling these skin-stripping lotions and potions – so skin-stripping that I swear you could remove paint/nail polish with them, actually – and pointing spot-stricken teens in the direction of gentler options. Read More…