My Life With Rosacea And What I’ve Learnt So Far

my-life-with-rosacea-and-what-ive-learnt-so-far

My naturally rosy complexion is so normal to me that I’d never considered it a problem. Waking up to an angry, bumpy breakout or stepping out of a hot shower with a bright red face was just normal. It’s what I did every day and I’d never given it a second thought.

But I’ve been on a strange journey over the past year or so. I started sharing my rosacea online with make-up free photos and was amazed at the volume of messages I got (and still get!) from women saying “your skin looks like mine”, relieved that they can relate to me. I was also surprised by the amount of people who have messaged to say how brave I am for sharing something as trivial as a photo of my face before applying any make-up.

BUPA research suggests that 1 in 10 of us in the UK are living with rosacea. Yet, we’re constantly bombarded with perfect images on social media. Hence why my bare skin has become quite the controversial subject matter.

Last month I visited Dr. Stefanie Williams at Eudelo in South London and she diagnosed me with two different types of rosacea. There are four variations, which cause redness and flushing in the skin. My diagnosis is two-fold: one equates to bumpy skin flushes, and the other, a firm degree of redness even in a calm state. The main thing to note about rosacea is that a level of acceptance is needed; you’re always going to have it. However, there are steps you can take to managing it, and identifying what causes it to go bananas.

Initially, there is a lot of work you can do around identifying triggers within your lifestyle. When you document your skin alongside your habits, you’ll start to notice patterns. For me, spicy foods, sugary foods, wine, stress and extreme temperatures (hot or cold) are total redness triggers. But life is too short to cut the indulgences out, so really it’s about being clever.

Personally, I’ll avoid venturing out into the freezing cold for a bottle of wine and some chocolate cake the night before a special occasion. Lex from Talonted Lex blog has created a number of resources that you can download to effectively track and analyse your rosacea patterns.

Then there are the changes you can make to your beauty regime. For me, the first rule was the hardest: flannels are the devil. Any kind of abrasion to your skin can initiate the redness equivalent of World War Three, so removing make-up and cleansing your skin need to be simple and gentle – ideally with a cream cleanser like Cetaphil and your hands. Massage the formula into your skin gently to remove make-up and SPF, which you should be wearing every single day in as high a factor as possible. Your entire routine should ideally be fragrance-free and fuss-free.

Moving onto your make-up, nailing your coverage is key. For me, the ultimate remedy is the IT Cosmetics CC Cream, which gives a completely flawless finish but looks like you’re barely wearing anything because it has a dewy sheen. The right brush when applying will also do the work for you – work it in with the Real Techniques Expert Face Brush, taking circular motions all over and then patting product on to build cover in those extra-angry areas.

I’m on a journey with my skin and am still learning new tricks. It still impacts how attractive I feel in myself, especially when it flares up. When it comes to sharing make-up free photos with like-minded women in the name of challenging the perception of what we see as normal, I’m all for it. But sitting make-up free in front of a guy I am dating? At this point in time, it is something that is never going to happen.

For now managing my triggers and taking pride in my make-up is a confidence boost, and in time I hope I will grow to love what is an everyday part of my appearance.

Follow Rose’s journey on Instagram @mixedgemsbeauty. For more help and advice with dealing with rosacea, read Shabir’s guide: Rosacea Uncovered.

Everything You Need to Know About LED Light Therapy

One yellow light bulb standing out against 5 other pink light bulbs

Light-emitting diode therapy (or LED for short) is nothing new. Having long been used in professional treatments, the benefits of LED for acne-prone, rosacea-ridden, discoloured, dull and ageing skin come with regular use. While this might deliver great results, it has previously been a costly and time-consuming approach in the pursuit for healthy skin.

And thus, the emergence of at-home skincare devices, led by LED treatments in the form of targeted on-the-spot gadgets and full face masks, are becoming popular for consumers who want to maintain the results of in-clinic treatments and the efficacy of carefully curated skincare routines. According to global market researcher Mintel, 41% of beauty consumers use skincare devices to prolong the effects of professional treatments. With better access to information, technological advancements and more transparency from brands, high-performance products are no longer exclusively available in costly facials and specialist clinics. Plus, LED light treatments are the most pain-free facial you can have, with no tingling, side effects or downtime needed. What more could you want?

Here are all your questions about LED light therapy answered:

What are the benefits of LED for the skin?

“LED light emits therapeutic wavelengths of light energy to energise cells,” explains Laura Ferguson and Hannah Measures, co-founders of The Light Salon. In doing so, the light energy stimulates the production of collagen, elastin and antioxidants while improving blood and lymphatic circulation. It’s a treatment that is suitable for all skin types and is designed to be used after cleansing and exfoliating, followed by your serums and moisturiser.

How many different types of LED lights are there and what is the difference between them?

“Different light spectrum penetrates the skin in different depths and has different effects. Red and blue LED light therapy combat numerous issues, including but not limited to, dullness, fine lines and wrinkles, inflammation, redness and swelling. They replenish dermal and epidermal cells, stimulate the natural production of collagen and elastin and speed up the recovery process,” explains Dr Dennis Gross, dermatologist, dermatologic surgeon and founder of Dr. Dennis Gross Dermatology.

Near-infrared light is another option, suiting inflamed skin best as it stimulates the skin’s healing and regeneration process by delivering nutrients and oxygen to problem areas, leaving you with strengthened and brightened skin. If acne is a concern, Ferguson and Measures recommend red light as it has an antiseptic effect on blemishes and reduces inflammation and painful swelling within the spot to help speed up the healing of the area. Impressively, when used together near-infrared and red light are clinically proven to reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles.

What’s the difference between an LED treatment in a clinic and an at home device?

At-home devices don’t have the power of the professional machines used in LED light therapy treatments, but Ferguson and Measures explain that if you use an LED light mask three times a week over a four week period, it delivers the equivalent cumulative dose of light as one salon treatment, if you went once a week for the same period. “Results are instant and long-term and because LED light therapy works on a cellular level, so you leave with a glow, which becomes more pronounced with each treatment. Think of it in terms of a workout – going once is better than not going at all, but if you make an effort to stick to regular sessions, you’ll get great cumulative benefits.”

How To Find The Right Liquid Exfoliator For Your Skin

Garden of Wisdom

Unless you have been living under a rock for the past two years, you will have noticed a sharp increase in the amount of acid-based skincare products hitting the shelves. While scrubs might have been the tried and tested method of sloughing away dead skin a few years back, now it is all about the liquid exfoliator. So much so, Pinterest has seen a 58% increase in searches for liquid exfoliators. Read More…

Azelaic Acid: Why You Should Be Using It

Azelaic Acid

Yes, there has been a lot of chatter about acids over the past year or so, and yes, there always seems to be a new one that you should be using. But, Azelaic Acid genuinely should be on your radar regardless of your skin type or concern because it has an impressive skill set and helps to soothe and smooth skin. Read More…

Shabir And Trinny On Skincare Concerns

Trinny and Shabir

Shabir was back in the bathroom with Trinny Woodall over the weekend discussing more common skincare concerns. If you battle with hyperpigmentation, rosacea or have unwanted scarring, it’s definitely worth watching.

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Is There a Natural Treatment for Hives

nettles

Q: My daughter suffers with hives – red lumps over her body – when she overheats. Her doctor prescribed an antihistamine, which takes out the itch but not the lumps.

A: I used to get similar weals from monosodium glutamate, which is often added to Chinese and Thai foods. If she doesn’t suffer from any food sensitivity, pharmacist Shabir Daya advises that she uses Stinging Nettle Extract by Swanson, £14.95 for 120 capsules. Nettles are excellent at detoxifying the bloodstream, inhibit the formation of histamine and have an anti-inflammatory effect, he adds.

SKIN SAVIOUR

Jane Iredale, founder of the eponymous mineral make-up range, tells me she has seen good results on the faces and bodies of acne- and rosacea-prone adults with a course of Skin Accumax. This supplement contains vitamins A, C and E and a nutrient complex found in broccoli.

MY HEALTH: SARAH PARISH, 44, ACTRESS

I never go on the scales: doing the right exercise and eating good food is the key to being in great shape.

I fell in love with barre exercise classes in Vancouver, when my husband [actor James Murray] was filming there in 2011. It was so different from the gym and it worked muscles I didn’t know I had.

I was at the age where everything drops a few inches. The barre exercises are fantastically toning for trouble spots – bingo wings, bottom, waist, tummy and tops of thighs – giving you the lifting and firming you never get on a treadmill. Read More…