Being Optimistic Has Some Serious Health Benefits

Optimism

You’re either a glass half full or half empty kind of person. Few of us want to be grouped with the latter – there are few things less warming than someone who can’t see the bright side in anything. Aside from being more pleasant to be around, being an optimist has some impressive health benefits. 

Back in 2009, a study by the University of Pittsburgh found that optimists were less likely to get ill, while in 2013 researchers at Concordia University found that those with a positive approach were better at dealing with stressful situations. “On days where they experience higher than average stress, that’s when we see that the pessimists’ stress response is much elevated, and they have trouble bringing their cortisol levels back down. Optimists, by contrast, were protected in these circumstances,” Joelle Jobin, the co-author of the study told Science Daily at the time.

A more recent study by Boston University went one step further and found that an optimistic outlook can improve your chances of living longer. The study surveyed 69,744 women over 10 years and 1,429 men over 30 years to measure their levels of optimism, as well as their overall health and lifestyle habits, including whether their smoked or drank alcohol.

“Previous studies reported that more optimistic individuals are less likely to suffer from chronic diseases and die prematurely,” says Lewina O. Lee, clinical research psychologist at Boston University. “Our results further suggest that optimism is specifically related to 11 to 15% longer life span, on average, and to greater odds of achieving “exceptional longevity,” that is, living to the age of 85 or beyond.”

How can you be more optimistic?

Keep a journal: In a world where few of us have a minute to collect our thoughts, the idea of writing them down feels like a luxury. However, taking five minutes out before you go to bed to write down a couple of things you’re most grateful for in that moment can help reset your mind, and it can also help you sleep. 

Search for solutions: The office pessimist is never more obvious than when you’re in a crisis meeting looking for a way around the issue. Stewing on a problem often makes it feel bigger than it is and can exacerbate negative feelings. Where and when possible it is good to switch from being problem-focused to solution-focused. 

Focus on the improvement: It’s easy to set ambitious goals and lose enthusiasm halfway through when you haven’t reached them. However, there is that popular saying: ‘your speed doesn’t matter – forward is forward’. Try focusing on how far you have come rather than how far you have to go. Making small mindset tweaks can ultimately change your overall approach.

Look after your gut: Plenty of studies have linked our gut with our nervous systems. Making sure the bacteria in your gut is well-balanced and thriving can have a surprising impact on your mood. Life Extension noted this and formulated Florassist Mood, a probiotic that contains the two strains of bacteria that help improve our mood, Lactobacillus helveticus and Bifidobacterium longum. 

Build up a sweat: Whether it’s a run in the park or a brisk walk, it’s worth getting your heart rate up as when we exercise our body releases endorphins, which help boost our mood. Recent research has also suggested that those who spend more time surrounded by nature also tend to be happier and more positive, so perhaps it’s time we all started or ended the day with a stroll in the park?

How To Improve Your Energy

Radiator with pink wall

Where to start on an article about energy? I’m referring to the good vibes that flow on a sunny day when everything just clicks into place and turns out better than you might ever have hoped for. It’s something I’ve wanted to write about for a while because learning to harness good energy has had the most profoundly positive effect on my life and yet I’m conscious that it’s often referred to either in a spiritual or religious context (off putting for some) or in language that can sound “away with the fairies”.

And yet, good energy – the sort that makes everything better is something we can all create ourselves whether we are religious or not. Call it kindness or goodness if that makes it more palatable but once you’ve worked out how to create more of it and use it, I’m pretty sure the happiness and quality of your life will increase tenfold. Read More…

The Importance of Failure and Learning to Embrace Adversity

Importance-of-failure-and-learning-to-embrace-adversity

It’s strange how one of the most powerful life lessons is so steeped in pejorative language. To fail: an experience that is vital for growing and learning but which we are educated to believe is something to be ashamed of. We grow up with the idea that failure is the opposite of success.

Odd really when you watch a parent introduce a child to something new, let’s say, learning to catch a ball or writing their name. When it doesn’t happen the first time, parents are usually encouraging with reassurances of “Good try, don’t worry it will come with practice” or “anything important takes time and effort”. The parent is explaining that failure is just one step on the path to achieving something. It’s a belief that is totally aligned with science too; scientists know that an experiment is never truly a failure as such, rather, it’s a lesson, an important part of the whole journey. Read More…