Vitamins to take in your 50s

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It is important that you take the correct vitamins and supplements in your 50s to boost your health and vitality. The choice of supplements is overwhelming and the advice given can be confusing. Looking after your health is important at any age and never more so than in your 50s. In our 50s, we do not digest foods the way we did when we were younger and supplements can play an important role in filling any nutritional gaps.

Which vitamins should I take?

  • I believe that there are some fundamental supplements that are worth taking and these include:
  • A quality vitamin and mineral supplement
  • Probiotics because the digestive system gets sluggish with age
  • Omega 3 essential fatty acids since most of us do not get sufficient amounts
  • A calcium supplement to prevent brittle bone disease
  • A sublingual form of Vitamin B-12

Which vitamin and mineral supplement should I take? Read More…

Supplements To Take In Your 40s

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If you are reaching your 40s or are already in your 40s, your health should be a high priority. Eating a healthy and balanced diet and taking exercise regularly are a must, however you can further help your body by taking certain key supplements.

There are some supplements which I consider essential in your 40s and there are others which may be important to build a foundation for optimal health.

Should I take a multivitamin in my 40s?

I have always recommended a quality multivitamin as I consider this to be important because we often tend to eat food groups that may not necessarily provide an abundance of nutrients. Equally, our digestive system ages with us and so we may not be able to absorb these nutrients efficiently. A quality food state multivitamin will bridge the gap and act like an insurance policy to ensure that our bodies are nourished in order to work at their optimal level. Read More…

Why Changing When You Eat Could Boost Your Health

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With the festive party season about to start some of us might be tempted to enlist in a quick fix diet to burn off the extra calories we picked up on holiday. Cue the endless fad diets and mind-boggling eating habits. The most bizarre one we’ve heard of so far is a diet that consists of just beef, salt and water.

For years we’ve been focusing on what we eat (or what we shouldn’t eat), but new research suggests that we should be just as concerned about when we eat. According to the Salk Institute, eating in a ten hour section during the day can actually help you to lose weight because it works with your body’s circadian cycle.

“For many of us, the day begins with a cup of coffee first thing in the morning and ends with a bedtime snack 14 or 15 hours later,” Satchidananda Panda, a professor in Salk’s Regulatory Biology Laboratory and the senior author of the new paper told Science Daily. “But restricting food intake to 10 hours a day, and fasting the rest, can lead to better health, regardless of our biological clock.”

The study found that by working with our circadian cycle and eating when our digestion genes are most active. Impressively, the study found that eating within that time-frame also reduced the chances of obesity, high cholesterol and other diseases.

A similar study found that eating breakfast 90 minutes later than usual and having dinner 90 minutes earlier could also be beneficial to your health and help you lose weight. Over a 10 week period the study found that those who tweaked their eating times tended to have a reduced appetite and snack less throughout the day, compared to those who had unrestricted eating times.

“Although this study is small, it has provided us with invaluable insight into how slight alterations to our meal times can have benefits to our bodies,” Dr Jonathan Johnston, Reader in Chronobiology and Integrative Physiology at the University of Surrey, told Science Daily. “Reduction in body fat lessens our chances of developing obesity and related diseases, so is vital in improving our overall health.”

While restricting your intake of food to 10 hours might not be appealing to some, it’s certainly more feasible than living off beef, salt and water. Regardless of what diet you’re tempted to try, ensuring your body gets the recommended nutrients is essential for it to function properly. Shabir recommends that almost all of us take a good quality multivitamin, such as Alive Multivitamins. Deficiencies in iron and magnesium are fairly common in seemingly healthy adults, so it is also worth looking into these supplements. If you’re unsure of what to take, contact us and Shabir can advise you.

Cow’s milk allergy: how to spot the symptoms

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Q: My six-month-old son is permanently below par, with eczema, runny tummy (and nose), and shortness of breath. My doctor says he will grow out of it but I wonder whether he could have an allergy to something?

A: Your child may have cow’s milk allergy (CMA ), according to paediatric allergy specialist Dr Adam Fox, chair of the Allergy UK Health Advisory Board (allergyuk.org), who is leading the campaign Act on CMA to raise awareness of the condition. ‘This often develops when milk is first introduced either in formula or at weaning, but it can also appear in exclusively breast-fed children, due to cow’s milk proteins in breast milk.’ Read More…

How To Camouflage Facial Discoloration

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Q I have a port wine stain on my face, which although not big is quite noticeable. I have never bothered about disguising it before, but my little boy is getting teased at school because of me. What can I do?

A: Port-wine stains (naevus flammeus) are red or purple marks, most often on the face, which are caused by a patch of blood vessels that dilate (expand) abnormally. This allows more blood to flow into them causing a ‘stain’ that shows through the top layer of skin. Read More…