Shabir And Trinny On The Best Supplements

Trinny and Shabir

If you find the world of supplements overwhelming then watching this 20 minute video will help. Shabir and Trinny explore the best supplements and explain what they’re good for and why you might benefit from taking them…

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The Menopause, Cardigans And Me

Close up of black and white cardigan

For most women three things are certain: Taxes, death, and the menopause. At the moment I know which one I would give almost anything to avoid.

When I was young and foolish (I’m still one of those two things) I used to say that when I no longer needed my womb I’d get rid of it. I always assumed this would be straightforward. Particularly in Manhattan where I was living,when I determined that I was definitely ready to be rid of the thing that was facilitating my gruesome, long term menorrhagia.

When I put this suggestion to my OBGYN (American for someone who deals medically with everything vagina related), she looked horrified. ‘That’s a terrible idea’ she said. ‘The womb, as I’m sure you know is constantly in direct communication with the brain. Oestrogen is important to  almost all the tissues and cells in the body. We don’t want to stop that conversation unless we really have to’.  I had to concede that I hadn’t really thought about it that way. ‘No’ said the OBGYN grimly, ‘most women don’t until they get to menopause.’

In an ironic twist of fate, I didn’t reach menopause with my womb intact. It turned out there was a reason for all of that heavy bleeding (pre-cancerous cells). And so, aged 50 I was womb-less and staring down the barrel of early onset menopause. There was a hope that my limp ovaries which had been spared, would recover from the trauma and produce enough oestrogen and progesterone to keep my reproductive ‘female’ system ticking over. If this happened then my body would be fooled into thinking that I was still ‘viable’ and worthy of the kind of things that oestrogen and progesterone prompt and provide: sleep, the power of concentration, libido, skin elasticity, hair growth, metabolism stability and equanimity of mood.

At first it seemed that the trick had worked. Four months out of my hysterectomy  (for which read brutal, major surgery – that bit gets glossed over too by most gynaecologists male or female) I was, I thought back to normal. I was running again (not as fast as before), I was thinking again (though it was all a bit foggy) and my scar was healed.

But then I began to get sick. The jury will always remain out on whether or not the op kicked off my auto-immune disease, but alongside this development, my menopausal symptoms began to creep up on me. Because I was on huge doses of steroids for my autoimmune disease, it was at first hard to know what was causing what. But as the years have progressed I’ve come to understand which symptoms are menopause related – hot flushes and no sleep are definitely the menopause, foggy brain, fuzzy hair and osteopenia could be either, as could utter exhaustion, but more likely my AI.

My local GP was bent on prescribing me the dreaded menopause ‘tablet’, which I associated with non-bio identical hormones and a higher cancer risk (that theory as with so many others of mine turned out to be nonsense). But in those days I lacked perspective and frankly had more available cash than I do now, so I did what everyone else I knew was doing: I went to see one of only two Harley Street menopause ‘experts’ available at the time.

These ‘experts’ were making a name for themselves by prescribing so called ‘bio-identical hormones’ which were derived from plants and thus, it was assumed, better for you. The female was busy for months, so I reluctantly went to see ‘the bloke’, who talked to me as though he was fixing my car, not helping me through one of the most traumatic periods in a woman’s life. ‘It’s mud at a wall really this menopause stuff. We still don’t know very much,’ he said cheerfully (well, you would be cheerful given what he was charging).

What was true then and remains true today, is that every woman is different and we all have varying degrees of symptoms and react differently to the treatments on offer. In an ideal world, we would all have tailor made HRT prescriptions. But given that our hormone levels vary so radically at different times of the month, this, even if you have untold funds and are prepared for weekly blood tests, would be almost impossible.

For a while the treatment HRT man prescribed – oestrogen in the form of Estrogel applied topically – seemed to be working. Or maybe I was imagining it..? But three months later I found myself back where I had been, with all of my symptoms re-emerging. To cut a very long story, very short, after months of research and trialling various options, including additional progesterone, testosterone, oestrogen patches, various herbal remedies, folic acid,  (and another expert – this time a woman – new to the scene) I gave up. I began to grow worried about my already vulnerable body, which was by then undergoing chemotherapy for my AI, taking another hit with these hormones.

For the last two years I’ve been HRT free and in full-on menopause. I’m still being treated still for my AI, which has meant I’ve had to find alternative ways to cope. Here’s what I know.

It’s a cliché, but it’s true that if men had the menopause we’d be well on our way to effective treatment. We really are at the beginning of the research cycle on menopause, which needs greater funding and attention.

See a female doctor to discuss any symptoms or treatment: Men can’t, don’t and won’t know about how you are feeling and what you are experiencing. Even a young female doctor will have likely seen her mother go through the symptoms and will have a level of understanding and hopefully empathy, which a male doctor will be lacking.

Don’t take no for an answer: If you are experiencing symptoms, then you are entitled to HRT. The all-singing, all dancing HRT pill prescribed by most GP’s seems to be as safe as anything else out there and it also contains hormones which are identical to our own (and it’s regulated). But bio-identicals which are derived from plant oestrogens (and might make us feel better about taking the drugs) are also available on the NHS – ask your GP.

Don’t be embarrassed: Talk about menopause at every available opportunity. Without bringing it out into the open and making it part of everyday conversation the stigma and lack of research and empathy will continue.

Exercise: Even a little will help the symptoms. Walk, swim, jump up and down on the spot, lift cans of tomatoes instead of weights. Don’t feel bad about not getting to a class or the gym. The way menopause can make you feel it’s a miracle you got out of bed this morning.

Cardigans: People this is big. Cardigans are your best friend during menopause –  they can be swiftly and neatly discarded or buttoned up, depending upon your thermostat, without messing up your hair or causing a commotion in a meeting.

Always carry a handkerchief (see above): A swift mop of the brow can be reassuring. And sometimes even chic.

Fragrance: I’m going to recommend Chanel No 5 here. It’s not my favourite, but the aldehydes which make it fizz and sparkle when you first put it on may have a similar effect on you. I said may….

Lubricant: No, not for there, well alright also for there, but generally speaking your entire body is running out of moisture – apply liberally – everywhere. Obviously face cream should not be used below the neck…

Hair: I don’t care how much you have or if you don’t have any and are wearing a wig. Take care of it. Moisturise, cut, colour. I’ve tried the going total grey route. It didn’t work for me. I’m not saying it won’t work for you, but an hour spent at the hairdressers is an hour on your own without anyone bothering you.. You all know what I’m talking about.

Shabir and Trinny On Menopause

Shabir and Trinny

If you missed Shabir and Trinny Woodall’s Facebook Live this weekend, catch up on everything here. Themed solely around the menopause, Shabir offered advice on how to tackle the most common symptoms with natural remedies.
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Broken Sleep From Night Sweats

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Is a common problem going up to menopause. According to a 45-year-old reader, who had been suffering from menopausal symptoms, taking Sage Complex has helped her greatly. ‘I knew it was working because I felt so much better. I stopped taking it and my symptoms came back. This time I will carry on.’ Sage Complex contains a number of phyto(plant)- oestrogenic herbs, all of which have been linked to balancing hormones and so helping to relieve hot flushes, night sweats and vaginal dryness. £24.50 for 90 capsules.

TAKE THE FUSS OUT OF FUSSY EATING

Fussy eating not only causes stress at mealtimes but almost half of parents worry that it will impact on their child’s wellbeing, according to a recent survey for Abbott Nutrition, manufacturer of PaediaSure Shake, a special supplement for children who may not be getting the optimum nutrition from their food. Working with a specialist psychologist and nutritionist, Abbott has developed a branded website, fussyeaters.co.uk, offering guidance.

However, the second ingredient by amount after hydrolysed corn starch in PaediaSure Shake (£9.99, boots.com) is sugar, which may not suit every child.
Leading nutritionist Dr Marilyn Glenville (marilynglenville.com) recommends Floradix-Kindervital, a liquid multivitamin, which comes in a fruity formula without added sugar (£9.25, hollandandbarrett.com): ‘It tastes good enough to take on a spoon or you could add it to a shake.’ Read More…

Gloss It Like Kylie

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Phylia De M, the US natural haircare range, is a byword for healthy, glossy locks, with best-tressed fans including Kylie Minogue. The simple suits-all range of one shampoo, Clean, and one conditioner, Condition, has transformed my haystack, too!

For those people not blessed with thick manes, the leave-in treatment Connect has helped to reverse hair loss from different causes, including illness and stress. It contains fulvic and tannic acids and aloe and was devised by oncologist-turned-herbalist Dr Dick Miyayama. The blend promises to ‘help restore the body’s ability to grow healthy hair and stop excess shedding and thinning’.

Now Phylia De M has launched Re-Connect, which is designed to be used on alternate days after using Connect for at least one month. Connect serves to detox the nerves, heal the skin and scalp and fortify existing hair, and Re-Connect stimulates the hair follicle. Read More…

Vaginal Dryness

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Vaginal dryness (the side effects of atrophy) affects many post-menopausal women and also those taking anti-oestrogen breast cancer medication. ‘Tamoxifen caused me problems with vaginal soreness,’ emails one reader. ‘I spent so much money on creams and tablets but nothing worked. After taking it for a month, Sea Buckthorn Cellular Support has made a big difference to my life.’ Sibu Cellular Support Sea Buckthorn Oil, £19.99

TWO BOOKS, ONE FLAT TUM

The biggest concern that women fret about in swimsuit season is how to get a flat(ter) tummy. So I asked clinical nutritionist Kimberly Snyder, whose clients include actress Drew Barrymore and Black Eyed Peas singer Fergie, and yoga instructor Victoria Woodhall for their advice.

1. THE BEAUTY DETOX SOLUTION

Kimberly has written The Beauty Detox Solution (Harlequin UK, £12.99*), which I couldn’t put down. As well as banishing tummy bloat, she promises her programme will streamline your body, leave skin glowing, help you grow lustrous hair and strong nails – and you need never count calories again. By following her advice below, you will see a difference pretty quickly. Read More…