Victoria Meets Jo Fairley

jo

You might have read one of the many features she’s written for VH over the years, including Getting Your Yoga Mojo Back or the Apps That Make You Happier, but there is more to Jo Fairley than simply being a journalist and over the years she has added many strings to her bow…

Can you tell us a bit about your background?

I left school at 16 with 6 ‘O’ Levels – and a lot to prove, having been told by my careers teacher that I would never amount to anything. I trained as a secretary and worked my way up through magazines, becoming the youngest-ever editor of a magazine – Look Now (a title for nice teenage girls) – at 23, then going on to edit the fashion title Honey, where over the three years of my editorship I worked with amazing photographers at the start of their careers, such as Mario Testino and Ellen von Unwerth, and had Mary Greenwell and Sam McKnight as my ‘resident’ hair and make-up team. Read More…

Do You Live In The Most Stressed Out City?

stressed office worked top down view

It is highly likely that at one point or another this week you will feel ‘stressed’. If you’re a male salesperson living in Cardiff your chances are even higher. According to Perkbox, an employee benefit scheme company, the Welsh capital topped the chart with 70 percent of workers saying they’re stressed. Wolverhampton was a close second, followed by London, Coventry and Liverpool.

Around 70 percent of men feel stressed at work, with those aged between 25-34 being the most likely to suffer with work-related stress, compared to one in three women. Finance topped the list in terms of most stressful industries, followed by national and local government and the health sector, while those working in sales and HR departments are likely to bear the brunt. Read More…

Takeaway Tips From Shabir and Trinny’s Menopause Facebook Live

Shabir and Trinny

If you missed Shabir and Trinny Woodall’s Facebook Live this weekend, catch up on everything here. Themed solely around the menopause, Shabir offered advice on how to tackle the most common symptoms with natural remedies.
Read More…

January Newsletter

january-18-newsletter-2

Hello and welcome to 2018 and the January newsletter; I was ever so tempted to make this the first-ever non-product related newsletter because there are so many things that I want to write about other than products. So this is what we are going to do; I am mostly going to write about health issues (actually Shabir is doing nearly all of that) and in between I will have a few soapbox moments, do some feedback, introduce you to new members of our team (exciting!) and somewhere amongst all of this there are a couple of treats and of course the feature articles, which are pretty profound this month.

As the new year begins, the buzz phase is self-care; it is everywhere you look. The New York Times (and as reported in Grazia) has declared that ‘self-care is the new going out’. We are notoriously bad in the UK at doing self-care and I am no exception. We feel guilty about nurturing ourselves and our needs, but in this brave new self-care world I actually ran away (far away) just before Christmas and for the first time ever I didn’t plug my laptop in and I turned my phone off. Life continued. Read More…

How To Tackle Low Mood

shabir-jan-18-mood

There are hundreds of thousands of people taking mood elevating drugs to tackle the symptoms of low mood and yet there have always been questions asked about whether mood elevating drugs actually work. Aside from whether this class of drugs work or are effective at all, the other question often raised is whether mood elevating drugs are safe to take.

According to the latest statistics, the use of mood elevating drugs continues to rise. Even more frightening is the fact that a quarter of those taking a mood elevating drug will remain on these for a decade or even longer. What is intriguing is that several studies appear to indicate that in some instances mood elevating drugs work no better than a placebo.

If you are feeling a bit down or have symptoms of anxiety and stress, one has to question whether mood elevating drugs would be the first choice or whether other strategies might be the answer. Read More…

Seasonal Affective Disorder

shutterstock_167961569

What is Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)?

Seasonal Affective Disorder, also referred to as SAD, is a condition that affects over half a million people in the UK. This condition impacts upon the mental well-being of people during the winter months particularly during January and February when the days begin to shorten. If you tend to feel really down during winter or find it hard to get going during the winter months, you may think that this is a natural reaction to the cold and dark days, but you may actually be suffering from SAD.

Sufferers of SAD often experience low mood, varied degree of depression, loss of energy, sleep problems, irritability, increased appetite, strong cravings for carbohydrates and sweet foods as well as headaches and muscle pain. The defining characteristics of SAD are that the symptoms return annually and go away during other seasons. Read More…