Big Head

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It started with my tubercular toe. But let’s not start at the very beginning; often a bad place to start. This week it started with the fat lady who fell on top of me; somewhere between sexual assault and attempted murder. It could have happened to anyone; but it happened to me. The fat lady landed on the cracked toenail that had already been run over by a PR who went all passive-aggressive with the wheels of my suitcase after offering to push it for me.

No sooner had foot queen at Margaret Dabbs glued my big toe back together than the fat lady danced on it.  I put out my hand to stop her having a second jig and sprained my wrist. Sane Shabir sent me Bromelain for soft tissue injury which solved that problem. Then I woke up with a spot. More like a planet than a spot. Next time you use a Spacemask, instead of going to Mars you could just pay a visit to the gigantic plook on my face. I could build homes on it and solve the international refugee crisis. Read More…

Lupus

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People think Lupus is very rare, but one in 3,500 people in the UK , most commonly young women between 18 and 45, are thought to be affected by some form of the condition. Lupus occurs when the immune system goes into overdrive and produces too many antibodies. Researchers have not yet identified the cause and there is no cure, but it runs in families. It can be controlled with drugs in most patients.

The first big hurdle was getting a correct diagnosis. There is no single test and the symptoms can mimic other conditions. I had lesions on my face and scalp, in my nose and on my arms and legs, plus mouth ulcers and arthritic symptoms. Doctors said I might have HIV or hepatitis C, the mouth ulcers could be gingivitis, the aches and pains down to sleeping badly and so on. Read More…

Spots

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Acne is a four-letter word. And is that a coincidence? It certainly sums up how most sufferers feel about it. Acne is the most common skin complaint of all – mostly prevalent among teenagers, and usually disappearing in the 20s. However, some types of acne may persist into adulthood – bringing considerable misery. (And actually, in the past few years – for reasons I don’t really understand – I’ve seen several friends who’ve previously been clear-skinned suddenly develop spots, in their 40s and beyond. Hugely confidence-draining it is, too.)

My professional observation as a professional, though (not just as a friend), is that spot control has to be a combined programme from inside out and outside in. Let’s sort the basics first – the internal bit. To be honest, there’s not much more I can add to the incredibly comprehensive in-depth look at acne which Shabir took in his editorial Take Control of Your Acne, here, in terms of the reasons for breakouts, and the supplements which can make a difference. Read More…