The Great British Beach Tan

summer_beach

British beaches are wonderful. I know; I happen to live 250 yards from one. Shingle. Seagulls. Blistering sunshine. (Yes, really, on a good day – and you can read my guide to my hometown here.)

Now, Club 55/St. Tropez, Hastings beach is not. I can’t think of anywhere on our coastline, actually, where you have to worry about ‘resort wear’. (With the possible exception of Rock, in Cornwall, which is a Bodenfest.)

But nevertheless, it is possible to acquire quite a decent tan (weather permitting). And indeed, I’d say you’re almost more likely to burn, close to home. Why so? Because it’s easy to kid yourself that the British sun’s thin and weak, and won’t do any damage – when in fact, a sunny Bank Holiday will turn countless throw-caution-to-the-sea-breeze sunbathers into lobsters faster than you can say Sun Protection Factor.

So yes: SPFs are the order of the (holi)day, even when – thanks to the credit crunch, the heinous exchange rate and redundancies – so many more are holidaying closer to home. It’s true: Brighton is not St. Barth’s. Penzance is not Portugal. Cromer is not Cannes, but as I say, it’s so easy to be lulled into a false sense of security, staying (and playing) outdoors all day. Even on a cloudy day in the UK, some UV gets through. (Although not as much as on a cloudy day in the Caribbean.) While it’s true that some dermatologists believe that our rising skin cancer statistics are linked to the two-week summer jet-away to the Med – roasting skin that’s under wraps for most of the year – any sunburn, even acquired close to home, will up your chances of developing skin cancer. (We’re talking four times the number of melanoma cases today as in the 70s, according to Cancer Research…) Read More…

Rosacea Uncovered

rosea

Rosacea is a skin condition that causes a persistent redness on the face, in particular on the cheeks, nose and forehead. There are millions of people worldwide that are affected by rosacea and it tends to affect mostly fair-skinned people between the ages of 20 and 60 and is nearly three times more common in women. Although rosacea is a harmless condition, it often has a high impact on the quality of life.

What causes rosacea and what are the symptoms?

Small areas of blood vessels on the face that normally blush become dilated, inflamed and visible through the skin as small red lines. These dilated blood vessels tend to get larger in size over a period of time. Often these symptoms may be accompanied by papules (red bumps) and pustules (pus-filled bumps), which resemble acne hence why rosacea is often referred to as Acne Rosacea. However, there are no whiteheads or blackheads in rosacea. Read More…