Thyme Out

The Furore Surrounding Thyme Out – by Catherine Robinson

 

  • There is always that moment on holiday where one of my children appears at my sun lounger bursting with cartoon tears with a cut, itchy bite, rash or worse, and I panic and think ‘crikey, did I pack Eurax, Calamine Lotion, E45, Sudocream, anti histamine on top of the eight million other medicines?’ Of course, it’s always the cream I left at home, so, off to the hotel doctor we go. The furore surrounding Thyme Out started with a few whispers, a couple of Instagram posts, and then, boom, it’s a race to buy it before it sells out. Thyme Out is an organic, all natural tincture infused with antiseptic Thyme and calming aloe vera that treats so many different skin ailments, you will have to bear with me while I list them: acne, eczema, psoriasis, rosacea, cold sores, itchy inflamed skin, cuts, grazes, prickly heat and pet rashes. It smells a bit like pizza but don’t let that put you off because it has the healing powers of the God Apollo. In fact, on my next holiday, I might just pack this and my bikini and be done with it. The 200ml bottle comes with a travel friendly 7 ml refillable bottle to be spritzed in times of crisis but don’t forget about it when you are back at home. It’s amazing at clearing teenage spots and most recently calmed and cleared a horrid skin rash caught from a plant after I was dragged into a bush by my new puppy. Thyme Out

     

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What You Need To Know About Parkinson’s Disease

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Q. My brother has been diagnosed with Parkinson’s at the age of 53. Is this very young? What can be done to help him? Am I at greater risk?

A. Parkinson’s is a progressive neurological condition for which there is currently no cure. It is caused by a lack of dopamine in the brain due to the death of nerve cells. Symptoms may vary greatly from day to day. According to the charity Parkinson’s UK, up to one in 20 of those diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease every year are under 40.

Tremor (shaking) affects about 70 per cent of people with Parkinson’s. It often starts in one hand, spreads up the arm and then to the foot on that side of the body. It usually occurs when a person’s muscles are relaxed and improves when they start an activity. In the early stages, squeezing or rolling a ball or pen in the hand can suppress a tremor.

Other common symptoms are slowness of movement and muscle stiffness. Less visible symptoms include sleep difficulties, depression and anxiety, as well as constipation and sweating. Read More…

How To Recognise Lyme Disease

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Q: I am 51 and used to be very active in my job as a country ranger. Recently, however, I feel very tired, my lower body aches, and my legs feel weak. Someone suggested this could be lyme disease. Could you explain what this is, and the treatment?

A: Lyme disease is a bacterial infection spread through tick bites. The pinhead-sized ticks are common in the northern hemisphere, in gardens, woods, moors and parks, both country and town. They also settle on animals, such as deer, horses, dogs, sheep and cows. In the UK, they are mostly active from April to October. However, not all ticks carry lyme disease, and infection rates in tick populations vary by species and geographic areas.

Lyme disease causes a wide range of symptoms, according to the campaigning support group Lyme Disease Action. Early signs, within two to 30 days of a bite, may include a circular red ‘bull’s-eye’ rash at the site, facial palsy and flu-like symptoms (such as fatigue, fever, headaches anda stiff neck). Other symptoms, usually of more advanced, untreated disease, include muscle and joint pain, and disturbances of coordination, hearing, sight, digestive system and sleep. The illness may lead to heart problems or disturb the central nervous system. Read More…

Why Cellulitis Is A Serious Health Risk

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Q My mother has just been told she has cellulitis in her leg, resulting from what looked like a scratch. It looks awful. What is cellulitis and how should it be treated?

A: Cellulitis is a bacterial infection of the skin, and the tissue beneath the skin. This causes the skin to rapidly become red, hot, painful, very tender to the touch and swollen. People may also have flu-like symptoms, such as chills and shivers, and feel sick. Read More…