Restless Legs Syndrome

restless legs syndrome

Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) is a neurological disorder which causes an awkward sensation in the legs along with an uncontrollable desire to move the limbs for relief. This uncomfortable sensation usually occurs in the legs and feet, but can also be present on the arms and elsewhere on the body. Most sufferers of Restless Legs Syndrome describe the sensation as a ‘creepy crawly sensation’, a tingling type, or as if pins and needles are being pricked into the affected part of the body. There may also be numbness which gives the sufferer a strong urge to move the limb or the affected part of the body.

The exact cause of Restless Legs Syndrome is still not fully understood however genetics play a link, magnesium and iron deficiencies have been implicated, certain drugs may be responsible for RLS, and some concerns such as diabetes increase the incidences of Restless Legs Syndrome.

I normally tend to recommend a good circulatory supplement such as Diosmin Plus. This supplement contains powerful circulatory herbs and extracts such as Gotu Kola, Ginger and Horse Chestnut to enhance the flow of blood in the entire body including the lower limbs. This helps to oxygenate all the tissues providing them with vital nutrients such as magnesium to ensure healthy muscle and nerve function. Do not take Diosmin Plus with blood thinning medications such as warfarin and heparin. Read More…

Why does our teenage daughter self-harm?

iron

Q: We think our previously happy 14-year-old daughter is self-harming. She seems to be pulling out her hair and has several grazes on her body. We don’t know what to do.

A: You are not alone: this is a growing problem in the UK and affects at least one in 15 young people, both boys and girls, according to Jane Smith, author of The Parent’s Guide to Self-Harm (Lion Hudson, £7.99*), which I suggest you read. The average age of onset is 12 years but some hospital admissions have been for children under ten. The majority never receive professional care so the burden falls on family and friends.

Many young people who self-harm come from stable, loving homes. Jane, whose two daughters were affected, says, ‘Finding out that the child you love feels driven to hurt themselves in secret comes as a huge shock; it’s heart-breaking.’

There is a wide range of severity. Self-harming can be minor and short-lived but it may also become addictive and serious. Read More…