The New Generation Of Gua Sha

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Chinese medicine has had a real resurgence this year with plenty of experts and beauty brands taking inspiration from the ancient ritualistic approach. It goes hand-in-hand with the modern concept of self-care and desire felt by many to strike the work/life balance and switch off.

If you follow Gill’s newsletters you’ll already be well-versed in the Hayo’u method and its authentic yet practical take on Chinese medicine and more specifically the Gua Sha massage technique. The skin-boosting Beauty Restorer has become a bestseller and offers a fool-proof approach to facial massage. This autumn, Hayo’u is launching three new tools. We caught up with the founder, Katie Brindle to find out more…

The hair reviver

For some, the idea that a piece of jade stone could in anyway help boost hair growth could be a bit far-fetched. Yet the Beauty Restorer Comb has been expertly cut and chiselled to do just that. Using the same approach as the original Beauty Restorer, the comb works by boosting your circulation to drive nutrients to the follicles in your scalp.

“It also massages the acupressure points of your head, regulating the meridians (energy channels) that flow through the scalp,” says Brindle. “This is great for your overall health.”

The inspiration behind the Beauty Restorer Comb was personal for Brindle. “I inherited thin hair from my mother and grandfather then endless dieting during my teens and early 20s resulted in anything remotely resembling a luscious head of hair,” she says. “Having tried everything on the market to no avail I gave up and resorted to extensions as it was so bad.”

For those who know this feeling all too well, Brindle recommends sweeping the comb across your scalp from your forehead down to your neck. While this can be done at any time of the day, on wet or dry hair, Brindle stresses that it should be done daily for the best results.

The eye brightener

Also known as the Beauty Restorer Precision, this small paddle wand has the potential to magically brighten and smooth your eye and lip areas. “It’s really simple to use, letting you get even closer to fine lines and wrinkles, particularly around the eyes and lips,” says Brindle.

Unlike the other Hayo’u tools, you need to use small ‘flick’ movements when you use this one and use your natural facial contours as a guide. For example, trace your eye socket with small flicks to boost and lift your eye area. Like with the comb, you do need to use the Beauty Restorer Precision regularly to see any difference.

While it was designed for the eyes and lips, you can use this tool all over your body. “The fine tip means you can use it for longer and with pinpoint accuracy to reach every contour, line and wrinkle around your whole face,” says Brindle. “It can also be used on specific areas of muscular tension and joint pain to clear inflammation and stagnation.” If you spend too much time sat at a desk or on your phone, you might find it helpful in treating carpal tunnel syndrome and RSI.

The skin booster

At first glance the Beauty Restorer Lite looks exactly the same as the original. But, upon closer inspection you’ll notice that it is much slimmer and lighter. Brindle designed it for those with more delicate skin. “The older we get, the thinner and more delicate our skin gets – due to the natural loss of elastin and collagen over time, as well as hormonal changes, which weaken it,” she explains.

“Children also need a gentler tool as each layer of their skin is only around one fifth of the thickness of adults.  thinner and more delicate. Each layer of young children’s skin is around one fifth as thick as adult skin,” Brindle adds. The Beauty Restorer Lite can be used in the same way as the original tool, following the traditional Gua Sha method, to help boost circulation and reduce inflammation. It’s also particularly good at helping to clear up teenage acne and breakouts.

For more information on Hayo’u and the Gua Sha rituals, click here.

The Facial Massage Debate

Beauty Jade Tool

Facial massage has been heralded as the one stop shop for plumping, firming and smoothing skin, as well as leaving it with a radiant glow. Unsurprisingly, plenty  of skincare experts advocate the use of massage in some way to improve the quality of your skin.

Most facials incorporate some form of massage too, be it a dedicated section of the treatment or an accompanying technique when the therapist is cleansing or moisturising your skin. The reason is that massaging the skin boosts your circulation and lymphatic drainage, which in turn reduces inflammation and puffiness.

Over the years, massage has evolved into a full workout for your face with some experts claiming that facial exercises could take years off of you. The vigorous massage techniques and pummeling are believed to tone and sculpt your facial muscles, as well as boost that fresh glow. Not everyone is on board though. There are some experts who stress that strong massage can actually breakdown your skin’s collagen and cause more damage than good.

In their book You: Being Beautiful, both Dr Oz and Dr Michael F. Roizen argue that: “Exercising the facial muscles is a sure way to increase wrinkles. The repetitive movements of the skin, over the years, combined with the normal thinning of the collagen and elastin of the dermis, will eventually crack the skin, causing wrinkles.”

So, how should you approach facial massage?

While you want it to supercharge your circulation and get the blood flowing, you don’t want to be too rough with your skin. Hayo’u founder and Chinese medicine expert Katie Brindle developed the Beauty Restorer tool with this in mind. To work in harmony with traditional Chinese massage technique, the jade tool is perfectly shaped to fit into the natural curves of your face and helps you to gently but effectively increase circulation. Jade is renowned for its soothing, cooling powers as well.

How long should you massage your skin for?

It can be for as long or as short as you need. The Hayo’u method promotes one minute and longer 10 minute rituals depending on how much time you have to spare. Plenty of experts recommend using your hands and incorporating massage into simple tasks, such as cleansing. A cleansing oil or balm is the best texture to use as it encourages you to really work the formula into your skin.

Do you have to use tools?

Plenty of therapists use their hands rather than tools to massage their clients skin, so there’s no reason for you to invest in one in order to reap the benefits. However, if you’re not sure how to approach facial massage or want the cooling powers of jade, then we recommend looking into the Beauty Restorer.

The Art Of Bathing

Bath Tub in Turquise Room Wooden Floor

Taking the have a long, hot soak in the tub is seen as a luxury for most of us. But in an era when the saying ‘health is wealth’ rings true, looking after our body from top-to-toe has moved up the priority list. Body care is on the rise, so it’s unsurprising that bathing is making a comeback.

The art of bathing goes back centuries and across the world almost every country has its own ritualistic approach. In Japan, it’s not uncommon to bathe once or twice a day and outdoor communal bathing – also known as rotenburo – is championed by hotels, magazine and even has its own TV programme. Over in Finland, the saying ‘the sauna is the poor man’s apothecary’ still remains prevalent as the country has almost as many saunas as it does inhabitants. It’s strongly believed that sweating it out in a sauna not only provides a full body cleanse, but also helps you to relax. The ritual is usually finished with a roll in the snow too. Read More…

Victoria Meets Katie Brindle

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Chinese Medicine might have been around for thousands of years, but few of us truly understand or appreciate the many health and wellbeing benefits it can bring. Enter Katie Brindle, an expert in the field with over 16 years experience. After a car accident put a stop to her dream of becoming an opera singer, Katie embraced Yang Sheung (the Chinese approach to self-care) to help overcome the complications around fertility, weight, stress, depression and fatigue that followed. To help others embrace the healing powers of Yang Sheng, Katie developed Hayo’u, a game-changing brand that is focused around one-minute rituals and a clever jade beauty tool. As Hayo’u launches on VH, we asked Katie a few questions about her approach…

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How To Deal With Emotional Stress

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Amongst all the self-help books clamouring to make you happier and banish negativity, Chinese wisdom is a lone voice of dissent. Because if you listen, it will tell you that it’s not natural, healthy, or even desirable to always be happy. It’s not only ok to be sad, or angry – it’s actually healthy. Chinese wisdom gently advises that all emotions are healthy for us and simply part of the tapestry of life. It’s too much emotion – of any kind – that is bad for our health. 

The Chinese way considers wild emotion to be addictive, distracting and bad for our health. Huge value is placed on peace, quiet joy, mindfulness and contentment. Read More…

The Benefits of Siberian Ginseng

Siberian Ginseng

What is Siberian Ginseng?

The root of the Eleutheroccocus centicocus plant, also called Siberian ginseng or Eleuthero, has been used in China and Russia for centuries with a variety of uses and benefits which it provides to our bodies. The plant belongs to the ginseng family and is perennial growing between 25 cm and 50 cm in height in the wild. Siberian ginseng is botanically different from true ginseng species, namely Korean and American ginseng.

Each Siberian ginseng plant can take several years to grow but the roots can live for over a hundred years. The roots are creamy yellow or white resembling a parsnip with rootlets that often resemble a man.

The Chinese have used Siberian ginseng for over 4000 years for its multiple benefits, whilst Russians discovered that this herb has similar properties to ginseng even if it does not belong to the ginseng family. Read More…