Five Ways To Boost Your Wellbeing This Autumn

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While the usual rumours of an Indian summer are circulating and temperatures are still well into double figures, there is no denying that summer is over and autumn is on its way. It’s getting dark at 7.30 pm and the days are certainly feeling shorter. Here are five ways to keep your energy levels high and boost your health this autumn…

Boost your immune system

In August, the NHS released its draft guidelines recommending we opt for natural remedies to support our immune systems rather than relying on medication to ease sore throats and common colds. If you’re prone to getting ill as soon as the weather changes start taking Daily Immunity now. With astragalus to boost your white blood cells and garlic to help fight off fungi and bacteria, taking two Daily Immunity supplements a day helps to support your immune system and protect against infections.

Switch up your vitamin D for autumn

Studies have been highlighting the link between vitamin D and the immune system, bone health and chronic illnesses for years. Yet, many of us don’t get the recommended amount of vitamin D, especially during the winter months. Experts tend to recommend anywhere between 2000iu and 4000iu of vitamin D per day should be sufficient. 

While it is possible to get vitamin D through a healthy diet, it’s thought that most of us only achieve about 10 percent of the recommended amount via this way. Therefore, lots of experts recommend we supplement vitamin D from October through to March. Better You’s D Lux 1000 Spray and the 3000 Spray are two of the most efficient supplements to top-up your  levels.

Avoid too much red meat

You might have lived on salads over the summer, but now autumn has arrived it’s time to start introducing warm food into your diet. Don’t over-indulge in hearty hot meals that can be hard to digest though. Chinese Medicine expert and acupuncturist Dr Phoebus Tian recommends avoiding red meat, particularly steak and opting for seasonal vegetables to ensure you get all the correct nutrients required at this time of year.  

Take time out

September and October are always a flurry of activity and then before you know it, it’s Christmas. Taking time out to switch-off and relax can make a whole world of difference. If you don’t have time to take a long, hot bath with Magnesium Oil Original Flakes, enlist the help of Magnesium Sleep Lotion. The lightweight lotion boosts your magnesium levels and not only helps to relax sore, tight muscles, but can also help you to drift off.

And, if you want to go the extra mile, invest in de Mamiel’s Anchor. The soothing balm includes watermelon seed oil and passionflower oil, which both maximise your body’s ability to absorb magnesium and B vitamins.

But don’t give up on the gym

A new study carried out by the University of British Columbia has suggested that our brains could be pre-wired to prefer lazing on the sofa and as a result, we’re getting lazier. As the evenings get darker it can be tempting to put-off going to the gym, but plenty of research has proven that exercising releases endorphins and can help reduce high stress and anxiety levels.

If you’re brave enough this autumn, one study has suggested that taking a daily dip in cold water can help fend off depression and anxiety. Writer Tina Gaudoin, who has written about her struggles with autoimmune disease, wrote about how wild swimming has helped keep her worries in check.

When Weight Loss Is A Problem

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Q: My elderly mother, now living on her own, is losing weight rapidly as she doesn’t have to cook for my father any more. Can you suggest simple ways of helping?

A; About one in ten people over 65 in the UK are malnourished but 88 per cent of people do not recognise the most common signs. In December 2014, the I-CARE Checklist (below) was launched by Abbott Nutrition (which makes prescription supplements for elderly patients) with the support of the Patients Association (PA) to raise awareness of the risks. PA chief executive Katherine Murphy said: ‘As families get together, it’s an ideal time to identify early signs that things may not be quite right, using this practical tool.’

Read More…

DLUX 1000 Spray

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VITAMIN D

As the strength of sunlight fades, boost your vitamin D levels with a supplement. This essential hormone is synthesised in the skin by UV light but many of us have low levels, particularly during winter. Vitamin D is vital for strong bones and teeth, as well as influencing many other functions, including immunity and mood. Choose a product with vitamin D3, such as Better You DLux 1000 Spray.


GETTING TO SLEEP

If you go to sleep easily but tend to wake in the early hours, don’t fret. Bi-or poly-phasic sleep – sleeping in chunks, in other words – was the norm until the advent of electric light. According to neuroscientist Professor Gaby Badre, ‘Sleep is a cyclic phenomenon and waking during the night is natural, although we are not always aware of it. In fact, four to five hours of continuous sleep in the first part of the night covers our need for deep sleep. But to feel refreshed – with enough REM sleep (the dream period) – we generally need seven to eight hours in total. The essential point is the amount of sleep we have over 24 hours.’

You can add shorter chunks when you go back to sleep in the early hours and by napping after lunch. ‘We have a natural dip in alertness between 1pm and 4pm. But don’t nap for longer than 20 minutes,’ he counsels, to avoid feeling groggy afterwards. Read More…

The Vitamin D Lowdown

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The Vitamin D Lowdown

  • Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin, also categorised as a hormone. It is made by our bodies from cholesterol by the action of UVB from sunlight on our skin.
  • It helps to control the amount of calcium and phosphate in our bodies, which are needed for healthy bones, teeth and muscles.
  • In this country, most people should get enough UVB in the summer months if they get outside in the sun, but UVB dwindles to almost nothing from October to March.
  • Vitamin D3 (the type we need) is also found in oily fish (salmon, mackerel, herring and sardines), egg yolks, red meat, fat, liver and fortified foods such as some dairy products and breakfast cereals. While it is wise to eat these, we would have to consume huge amounts to get enough – thus the need for supplements.
  • So how much vitamin D do we need? The recommended supplementary amount of vitamin D3 from the age of one to 70 is 400 IU (10mcg) and 320-400 IU for babies.
  • However, many experts believe 1,000 IU or higher is more appropriate for adults.
  • For people with diagnosed vitamin D deficiency, the recommended maintenance therapy (after testing to ensure an optimal level has been reached) is 800 to 2,000 IU daily.
  • Pharmacist Shabir Daya recommends trying the Better You DLux 1,000 Spray, a sublingual spray that provides 100 doses of 1,000 IU.

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The Joys Of Autumn

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When summer comes to an end, there’s an undeniable ‘back to school’ feeling. The arrival of darker nights and dropping temperatures signals a long winter ahead and this has a profound effect on our mood and our systems. Naturally, our minds jump ahead, but actually, we can make the decision to enjoy the seasonal shift into autumn. It is such a glorious time when the earth is still carrying the heat from the warmth of the sun and the leaves begin to change colour from green into a riot of golds, rich copper, nutty browns and honeyed yellows. Too often, it’s tempting to close the curtains and spend more time indoors – but getting out into nature is a great chance to witness all this happening and it slows things down. Read More…

Fend Off Festive Flu

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The lead up to Christmas is invariably frenetic, organising presents, food, guests, outings and the rest – on top of the usual day jobs. Then you stop for the holiday and, to add insult to injury, you get ill. As Dr Marilyn Glenville, author of The Nutritional Health Handbook for Women (Piatkus, £25), explains, ‘Your body can keep going on adrenalin while under stress, but as soon as you stop, everything comes crashing down including your immune system. Hence the onset of colds or flu, with aching joints, plus tummy upsets and indigestion, especially with rich food and drink.’

Here are Dr Glenville’s top ten tips for staying well this festive season: Read More…