My Skincare And Wellness Supplement Routine

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After last month’s article all about how I use supplements as part of my skincare routine (here), I decided it was time to share exactly what I use and why. Like skincare, I fully believe that supplemental therapy is very personal, but there are so many vitamins, minerals, herbs and plants to choose from that it can be very confusing and overwhelming. I wanted to explain my routine in the hopes that it will help anyone out there experiencing the same health issues or skin concerns that I am. Read More…

Turmeric – Can It Help Prevent Alzheimer’s & Dementia?

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Turmeric is an ancient spice that has been used for centuries in Indian and Chinese medicine and cooking. Traditional usage of turmeric covers a very wide spectrum of concerns ranging from topical usage as a poultice for curbing localised inflammation through to taking the powder internally for the relief of stomach complaints, bladder infections and arthritis.

With the myriad of claimed benefits, turmeric has, over the last decade, been extensively studied and it is possibly the most researched herb in the world. Turmeric contains a group of powerful antioxidant compounds collectively termed curcumin and it is this compound that is responsible for turmeric’s remarkable properties, which include: Read More…

The Science of Staying Younger

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Staying younger without stopping time is something most of us would love to master. Yet, ageing is a multi-faceted process with numerous factors that can have an effect on it. The cells of our bodies are programmed to have a finite lifespan. Each time a cell divides, some genetic material is lost so that on average, forty to fifty cell divisions later, the cell is considered to be aged. Nutrition plays a vital role in the science of ageing. Some nutrients accelerate ageing whilst others help to protect against it. The theory of free radical damage and the role of antioxidant nutrients is well understood by most people. It states that the body produces reactive, unstable agents known as free radicals during normal metabolism, exposure to ultraviolet light or environmental toxins. Antioxidants neutralise these free radicals helping to protect the body against damage.

The science of ageing and telomeres is now rapidly growing. Among the leading experts in this field is Dr Elizabeth Blackburn from the University of California who, along with her colleagues, was awarded the 2009 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine for the discovery of “how chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the enzyme telomerase”.

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