Should We All Be Eating Seasonally?

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With most of us becoming increasingly aware of our carbon footprint, eating the fruit and vegetables that are in season is common practice for a lot of households these days. Companies such as Odd Box and Farm Drop have made it effortless with their weekly deliveries of locally sourced produce that supermarkets have rejected due to their peculiar shapes and sizes. 

There are other benefits to eating seasonally too. Speak to almost any nutritionist and dietitian about how to eat a healthy, balanced diet and they’ll recommend you shop seasonally as the food is deemed to be more nutrient rich.

It is also a fundamental pillar of Chinese medicine, as founder of Hayo’u explains: “Chinese wisdom has suggested ways to adjust what we do every season to stay in balance with nature. The amount we sleep, the food we eat and the life choices we make can be gently adjusted to bring us into line with the natural cycle.”

So, what should we be eating?

Root vegetables are very much in season. Think carrots, beetroots and artichokes. “Bone stews, warming casseroles, fresh ginger, turmeric and miso soup paste are all good things to indulge in,” says Brindle. 

It’s definitely time to lay-off the salads as it’s thought that eating too much cold, raw food during the winter can play havoc with your digestion. However, warming, hearty soups and stews packed full of grains, cabbage and root vegetables alongside a cup of ginger tea – cue Triple Leaf Tea’s Ginger Tea – can do wonders for you.

Brindle goes as far as to recommend going no colder than room temperature. “I only eat warm food and definitely no ice in my drinks to avoid unnecessary work for my digestion,” says Brindle. “In Chinese medicine, the stomach is described as a bubbling cauldron, full of digestive fires that are put out by the cold. Any raw food sits undigested in your stomach.”

Will eating seasonally fend off colds and lurgies?

As we mentioned, seasonal produce is thought to be more nutrient dense, however you need to eat a lot of vegetables to ensure you’re maintaining the daily amounts to keep your body at optimum health. Hence why Alive Once Daily Multivitamin by Natures Way are one of the most common supplements Shabir recommends to readers.

If you are prone to catching colds throughout autumn and winter it might be worth introducing Daily Immunity by VH into your routine. With the help of probiotics, zinc, vitamin D and C and astragalus, this daily supplement helps to support your immune system. It’s one of those supplements that you don’t realise is working until you stop taking it and start to feel the glands in your throat.

To learn more about Chinese medicine and eating seasonally, check out Katie Brindle’s book, Yang Sheng: The Art Of Chinese Self Healing

Five Ways To Boost Your Wellbeing This Autumn

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While the usual rumours of an Indian summer are circulating and temperatures are still well into double figures, there is no denying that summer is over and autumn is on its way. It’s getting dark at 7.30 pm and the days are certainly feeling shorter. Here are five ways to keep your energy levels high and boost your health this autumn…

Boost your immune system

In August, the NHS released its draft guidelines recommending we opt for natural remedies to support our immune systems rather than relying on medication to ease sore throats and common colds. If you’re prone to getting ill as soon as the weather changes start taking Daily Immunity now. With astragalus to boost your white blood cells and garlic to help fight off fungi and bacteria, taking two Daily Immunity supplements a day helps to support your immune system and protect against infections.

Switch up your vitamin D for autumn

Studies have been highlighting the link between vitamin D and the immune system, bone health and chronic illnesses for years. Yet, many of us don’t get the recommended amount of vitamin D, especially during the winter months. Experts tend to recommend anywhere between 2000iu and 4000iu of vitamin D per day should be sufficient. 

While it is possible to get vitamin D through a healthy diet, it’s thought that most of us only achieve about 10 percent of the recommended amount via this way. Therefore, lots of experts recommend we supplement vitamin D from October through to March. Better You’s D Lux 1000 Spray and the 3000 Spray are two of the most efficient supplements to top-up your  levels.

Avoid too much red meat

You might have lived on salads over the summer, but now autumn has arrived it’s time to start introducing warm food into your diet. Don’t over-indulge in hearty hot meals that can be hard to digest though. Chinese Medicine expert and acupuncturist Dr Phoebus Tian recommends avoiding red meat, particularly steak and opting for seasonal vegetables to ensure you get all the correct nutrients required at this time of year.  

Take time out

September and October are always a flurry of activity and then before you know it, it’s Christmas. Taking time out to switch-off and relax can make a whole world of difference. If you don’t have time to take a long, hot bath with Magnesium Oil Original Flakes, enlist the help of Magnesium Sleep Lotion. The lightweight lotion boosts your magnesium levels and not only helps to relax sore, tight muscles, but can also help you to drift off.

And, if you want to go the extra mile, invest in de Mamiel’s Anchor. The soothing balm includes watermelon seed oil and passionflower oil, which both maximise your body’s ability to absorb magnesium and B vitamins.

But don’t give up on the gym

A new study carried out by the University of British Columbia has suggested that our brains could be pre-wired to prefer lazing on the sofa and as a result, we’re getting lazier. As the evenings get darker it can be tempting to put-off going to the gym, but plenty of research has proven that exercising releases endorphins and can help reduce high stress and anxiety levels.

If you’re brave enough this autumn, one study has suggested that taking a daily dip in cold water can help fend off depression and anxiety. Writer Tina Gaudoin, who has written about her struggles with autoimmune disease, wrote about how wild swimming has helped keep her worries in check.

The Joys Of Autumn

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When summer comes to an end, there’s an undeniable ‘back to school’ feeling. The arrival of darker nights and dropping temperatures signals a long winter ahead and this has a profound effect on our mood and our systems. Naturally, our minds jump ahead, but actually, we can make the decision to enjoy the seasonal shift into autumn. It is such a glorious time when the earth is still carrying the heat from the warmth of the sun and the leaves begin to change colour from green into a riot of golds, rich copper, nutty browns and honeyed yellows. Too often, it’s tempting to close the curtains and spend more time indoors – but getting out into nature is a great chance to witness all this happening and it slows things down. Read More…