Exercise Could Help Ease SAD This Winter

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Darker mornings and longer evenings mean that a lot of us rarely catch much daylight during the week. According to YouGov, around 29 percent of the UK battle with debilitating SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder), while almost two thirds of us feel noticeably less happy during the winter months compared to the summer. The lack of sunlight throughout the colder months can affect your melatonin and serotonin levels, and leave you feeling tired, lethargic, anxious and depressed.  

Spring might feel like a long way away, but if you have suffered with symptoms of SAD previously there are a few tricks you can employ to help lift your mood. Earlier this month, a study highlighted how exercise can help alleviate depression and anxiety. Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital looked over data from over 8000 people and concluded that regular exercise can help reduce depressive episodes.

“Our findings strongly suggest that, when it comes to depression, genes are not destiny and that being physically active has the potential to neutralize the added risk of future episodes in individuals who are genetically vulnerable,” says Karmel Choi, PhD, of MGH and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and lead author of the study. “On average, about 35 additional minutes of physical activity each day may help people to reduce their risk and protect against future depression episodes.”

This isn’t the first study to outline the benefits exercise can have on our mood. For years, experts have been championing that well-established idea that working out releases mood-boosting endorphins. What makes this study particularly interesting is that the researchers discovered that both high-intensity activities, such as aerobics and dances, and low-intensity forms, including yoga and stretching, can help reduce your chances of having a depressive episode. In fact, the researchers concluded that by adding four hours of exercise into your week can reduce it by 17 percent.

What does four hours of exercise look like? Well, it could be four hours of cardio in the gym, or a weekly 1.5 hour yoga class paired with 30 minutes of brisk walking five days a week. If that feels like too much of a commitment but SAD is something you’ve struggled with previously, Shabir has a couple of tricks to help, including two fast-acting supplements – read more, here.

Supplements To Take In Your 30s

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For a lot of women, the 30s are a turning point when it comes to health. The days of staying out late or all night and indulgences in food and drink are usually lower down in priority.

A healthy, varied and balanced diet is nevertheless a good starting point to provide the body with all the essential vitamins, however we are all prone to eating food groups that we like and so often we may miss out on some of the nutrients which are required by the body on an ongoing basis. This is where supplements in your 30s can bridge the gap, particularly a quality food-state multivitamin such as Alive Once Daily Multivitamin Ultra Potency. Read More…

Morning Anxiety: Five Tricks To Help You Feel Less Frantic First Thing

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If you’re not a morning person, you’re not alone. What most of us would give for a few more hours’ sleep during the working week. However, while most feel lethargic and a bit sluggish when their alarm goes off, there are others who wake up to quite the opposite scenario – a racing heartbeat, serious sweating and a whirring brain that refuses to slow down. Up until three years ago, I fell into the latter category, with my daily pangs of morning anxiety leaving me drained before I’d even gotten out of bed. Read More…

The Molecule That Could Reduce Your Anxiety

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Ever heard of neurotrophin-3? We hadn’t either up until a couple of weeks ago. But, if you regularly battle with bouts of anxiety then it’s a molecule worth learning about. According to a new study neurotrophin-3, or a lack of it, plays a key role in how and if we respond to outside threats. Read More…

Battling With Anxiety? Look After Your Gut

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The gut has been described as our body’s second brain and this week researchers at Shanghai Mental Health Center at Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine in China confirmed the link between the two. After reviewing a whopping 21 studies, the researchers found that over half of them pointed to a substantial link between gut bacteria and anxiety. So much so, researchers concluded that changing the microbiota in your gut could help alleviate anxiety. Read More…

The Reason You Might Not Be Having Enough Sex

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We’re in the midst of National Stop Snoring Week. Yes, there really is such a thing. Snoring is a big issue for a lot of couples. A recent study by Ginger Research found that almost three quarters of Brits have a partner who snores in bed, with 45% claiming to be regularly woken by the sound, and over a third having been forced to wake their other halves up in the night because of their noisy sleeping. Read More…