What To Look For In A Good Face Cream

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Face cream is one of those beauty products that you can find in almost every bathroom cabinet. In fact, three quarters of British women and at least half of the male population use a moisturiser every day. With endless products on the market, each with its own enticing promise of better-looking skin, finding the right face cream for you is no mean feat. 

Why should you use a face cream?

There are more than a handful of buzz ingredients that brands highlight on their labels that promise to transform your skin. While smoothing out lines and brightening your complexion are attractive claims, what you really want your cream to do is strengthen your skin’s barrier. Read More…

Is It Worth Investing In Anti-Pollution Skincare?

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Pollution levels have been hitting the headlines recently. Over the past few years, certain areas of London have usually surpassed the legal limit for gas emissions within the first couple of weeks of a new year. In 2017, the capital breached EU limits at nearly 50 sites with Brixton Road in Lambeth reaching 94 micrograms of nitrogen dioxide per cubic metre of air (the maximum is 40ug/m3). While most of us are aware of the harmful impact excessive pollution has on our health, especially our lungs, experts are still exploring the ways it impacts our skin.

With a handful of studies highlighting that pollution can damage our skin and exacerbate the ageing process, it’s no surprise that a new genre of anti-pollution skincare has developed, and it’s proving popular. So much so, between January and June last year sales of anti-pollution products grew by 30 percent and the category was valued at £3.1 million, according to NPD.

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Astaxanthin Protects The Whole Body

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Astaxanthin, pronounced Asta-Zan-Thin, is a powerful antioxidant belonging to the group of natural pigments, called xanthophylls, a subcategory of the carotenoid family. Carotenoids are produced by both plants and animals and are antioxidants that are part of the survival mechanisms.

Sea animals such as lobster, crab and salmon get their colour from their diet of krill and other small organisms that eat plankton and algae which are rich in astaxanthin. Astaxanthin, used is supplements, is usually derived from the algae, Haematococcus pluvialis, which manufactures this antioxidant as a protective mechanism to shield itself from the harmful UV rays.

Astaxanthin has been shown to be one of the nature’s most powerful antioxidant nutrient. It has been shown to be many more times potent than vitamins C or E, beta carotene, lutein or pycnogenol which is why it is often referred to as a super-antioxidant. Read More…

The Science of Staying Younger

Grapes

Staying younger without stopping time is something most of us would love to master. Yet, ageing is a multi-faceted process with numerous factors that can have an effect on it. The cells of our bodies are programmed to have a finite lifespan. Each time a cell divides, some genetic material is lost so that on average, forty to fifty cell divisions later, the cell is considered to be aged. Nutrition plays a vital role in the science of ageing. Some nutrients accelerate ageing whilst others help to protect against it. The theory of free radical damage and the role of antioxidant nutrients is well understood by most people. It states that the body produces reactive, unstable agents known as free radicals during normal metabolism, exposure to ultraviolet light or environmental toxins. Antioxidants neutralise these free radicals helping to protect the body against damage.

The science of ageing and telomeres is now rapidly growing. Among the leading experts in this field is Dr Elizabeth Blackburn from the University of California who, along with her colleagues, was awarded the 2009 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine for the discovery of “how chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the enzyme telomerase”.

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