About Sarah Stacey

Sarah Stacey is the Health Editor of the Mail on Sunday YOU magazine and is co-author (with Jo Fairley) of the world’s bestselling series of beauty books, The Beauty Bible. She edits, with Jo Fairley, the accompanying website, www.beautybible.com

Posts by Sarah Stacey

Psoriasis

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A reader with psoriasis says Kerecis Psoria With MOmega3, a steroid-free cream, has calmed her dry, itchy, red skin. She has spent 25 years ‘trying everything including dietary solutions and [prescription] creams when it is unbearable. This is the first cream that has healed the affected area.’ (NB This is not a cure for psoriasis, but regular use may markedly improve it.)


Hit Snooze On Gadgets

A new concept has crept into the world of sleep research. Recent surveys show that about half of us fail to get enough sleep. Now, experts say that a significant factor could be blue light – the wavelength emitted from our electronic devices. Blue light affects levels of the sleep-inducing hormone melatonin, so we find it hard to sink into slumber and stay there. Changes in sleep pattern can disrupt our circadian rhythm, the internal clock that tells us when to sleep, wake and eat. Scientists believe that, over time, this puts our health at serious risk. Read More…

DVT: The Dangers

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Known as the queen of endurance cycling, Jasmijn Muller, 37, a management consultant, believed she was the embodiment of health until a pain in her leg proved to be a deep vein thrombosis (DVT).

In May this year, I was recceing the route for my solo Land’s End to John O’Groats record attempt in 2017. The first three days were hot and I was cycling long distances at speed, so I became dehydrated. Then I got bad food poisoning and lost any remaining fluid in my body. The next day, I felt weak and took the train, but continued cycling on days five and six. I returned home sitting in a train and a car, then spent two days working round the clock at my desk. So I had six days of relatively strenuous activity and dehydration, followed by four days of sitting down. Read More…

My Organic Life

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Helen Browning OBE, 54, is an organic tenant farmer in Wiltshire and chief executive of the Soil Association. She has been chair of the Food Ethics Council since 2002. I grew up on the 1,350-acre livestock and arable farm that I now run. I always knew I wanted to farm and did a degree in agricultural technology.

I had all the usual aspirations about getting huge yields, but then I saw the countryside changing, hedges being ripped out, wildlife disappearing and poor welfare of farm animals – especially pigs and chickens. Organic farming seemed like a possible solution, so I started to experiment. Read More…

A Natural Joint Booster

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On 3 April this year Sophie Day, 24, twisted her right foot as she landed after climbing a gate on her family farm. ‘It ached, but I carried on as normal,’ Sophie says. ‘The next day my knee was so swollen that I could hardly walk.’

An x-ray revealed no fracture and her GP organised an MRI . However, despite being fast-tracked, she had to wait for more than two months to have the scan. Meanwhile, she was prescribed a painkiller and an anti-inflammatory, plus physiotherapy to strengthen the ligaments and muscles. Read More…

Give Relief To Restless Legs

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I was at a play last night when my legs began twitching. It has been happening quite often since I reached late middle age. Is there anything I can do about it?

Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common condition of the nervous system. As well as involuntary twitching, RLS, which is often worse at the end of the day, can cause an irresistible urge to move your legs voluntarily (and sometimes other parts of the body) and/or a creeping crawling sensation in the legs. The charity RLS-UK offers information and support (01634 260483, rls-uk.org). Read More…

Time to Fix Sore Feet

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Q: I have a bunion on my right foot. How can I stop it getting worse and is it possible to reverse the problem?

A: More than 15 per cent of women in the UK suffer from bunions, due in part to our liking of pointy toes and high heels. Men may develop them, too, but far fewer do. Many sufferers have a family history of bunions.

A bunion (hallus valgus) is a deformity of the big toe joint. The main sign is the big toe pointing towards, or sometimes overlapping, the other toes on the foot. This may force the outer bone of the big toe to stick out and a bump to form. The big toe joint may be swollen and painful, especially when wearing shoes. Read More…